Gene editing holds promise as animal disease prevention of the future

  The disease first appeared in Brent Sandidge’s farm in 1992, back when it was still called “mystery swine disease.” Sandidge wasn’t fully aware yet of how this disease would plague him over the next two decades, how he would watch countless pigs succumb, becoming feverish, refusing food and failing to reproduce. He vaccinated his…

Genetic engineering could stop the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses – but should we use it?

By Lauren Puckett An epic battle has been growing for decades: Human versus mosquito. Humans attack with poisons, insecticides, vaccinations and medications, but more than one million people worldwide still die from mosquito-borne illnesses every year.  Today, we have the technology to fight these diseases, and it’s called genetic modification. Gene technologies, developed by mosquito…

Experts weigh the ethics of human gene editing

Imagine the potential for modifying human genes. Start small, and imagine curing genetically inherited diseases. Then picture children resistant to certain diseases, or a human race entirely tolerant of lactose. But also imagine children designed for superior intelligence. Or, to take another leap toward the fantastical, children designed to perceive infrared light, tolerate weightlessness or harness the energy…