Dr. Rany Prather has genetically modified pigs to be immune to the common respitory disease porcine.

Gene editing holds promise as animal disease prevention of the future

  The disease first appeared in Brent Sandidge’s farm in 1992, back when it was still called “mystery swine disease.” Sandidge wasn’t fully aware yet of how this disease would plague him over the next two decades, how he would watch countless pigs succumb, becoming feverish, refusing food and failing to reproduce. He vaccinated his…

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MU scientist finds selflessness to be key to spirituality

Franciscan nuns practicing Christian centering prayer say they experience union with God. Buddhist monks deep in meditation describe seeing the true nature of reality. As they deflect thoughts about their own world, they feel themselves connected to something larger – to God, or to the cosmos. And as they move into this state of spiritual…

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Five MU faculty elected AAAS fellows

Careers involving pigs, stem cells, protein structures and a range of other research areas won five MU faculty members spots as 2015 fellows in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society. The award, which dates back to 1874, recognizes members of AAAS whose scientific work or work promoting…

A 3D printed model of the Cas9 protein. Cas9 is responsible for cleaving target DNA, making it an essential part of the CRISPR-Cas gene editing technology. Photo courtesy of the NIH 3D Print Exchange, National Institutes of Health.

Experts weigh the ethics of human gene editing

Imagine the potential for modifying human genes. Start small, and imagine curing genetically inherited diseases. Then picture children resistant to certain diseases, or a human race entirely tolerant of lactose. But also imagine children designed for superior intelligence. Or, to take another leap toward the fantastical, children designed to perceive infrared light, tolerate weightlessness or harness the energy…