Invasive breast cancer cells are stained red. Image courtesy National Cancer Institute

Professionals don’t necessarily agree on the best standards to screen for breast cancer

COLUMBIA – About one in eight women will develop some kind of invasive breast cancer in her lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society. Finding those cancers isn’t always easy, especially with the current technology used to screen for them. Conventional mammograms have been plagued for years by concerns of false positives. In regular digital scans, images of…

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Teenaged cancer patients need to know there’s more to life than the hospital

CLEVELAND –Being a teenager is hard enough. Add in a cancer diagnosis, and an already-difficult time can feel unbearable. Three doctors at an Association of Health Care Journalists conference panel in April agreed that many teenagers need more psychological support than they’re currently getting during cancer treatment. “Mental health is absolutely the most critical need for this age…

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In Guinea, the ebola vaccine looks promising but answers are elusive

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Months after the start of an ebola vaccine trial, statisticians and scientists are still crunching the numbers to answer a crucial question: Does the vaccine work? World Health Organization medical officer Ana Maria Henao-Restrepo told an audience at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual conference Friday, “I can’t answer that.” Such is…

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Katy Mersmann

Katy grew up in Olathe, Kan. and just crossed the border for college. She got two undergraduate degrees from the University of Missouri in journalism and classical humanities and then came back for more. She’s currently a master’s student in convergence journalism, looking to finish up classes in May and start working in the field.…