Science writers define their voice amidst controversy

By Rachel Zamzow SAN JOSE — What is the job of science journalists? Are we cheerleaders for science, detached translators or bold truth-tellers? And how does this role shift in the face of polarizing controversy? Science writers covering the 2015 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science debated these roles Friday…

Internship fair, recruiters’ advice shows not all is lost for young journalists

By Sean Morrison SAN JOSE, Calif. — It was a refreshing sight. Representatives from heavy-hitting organizations in the science news world — National Geographic, Popular Science, Nature, The Scientist and many others — sat waiting to meet with young journalists at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference. They were offering internships. Paid internships. And along…

This year’s crew of science writers takes on #AAAS

By Sara Shipley Hiles SAN JOSE, California – Three students from the Spring 2015 Science, Health and Environmental Writing class attended the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in San Jose, California, Feb. 12-15. By the end of our first day in San Jose, they had attended and written about sessions on…

The Antidote rescues class from toxic misconceptions

By Sean Morrison “There is a method to the madness,” said the man in a red cape, ski goggles, shorts with tights, a half-dozen wristbands and a bicycle helmet. His shirt bore a broad “A” crushing a skull and crossbones. His side pocket held a calculator, as if the device were a grappling hook or other…

Researchers dig into the brain to resolve hearing loss

By Sean Morrison SAN JOSE, Calif. — Cochlear implants have long been the gold standard for providing profoundly deaf people a remedy to hearing loss. However, not everyone qualifies for the procedure. About 100 children are born each year without a missing or malformed cochlear nerve, rendering them ineligible for the procedure. Dr. Eric Wilkinson of…